Whose Madh'hab? Whose Opinion? Sh Amer
iSyllabus teacher Sh. Amer Jamil in this short clip speaks on the misunderstandings that may arise in the fiqh due to a lack of verifying the opinions transmitted from scholars. It also touches on the strength inherent in the established 4 schools of law compared to other opinions attributed to great scholars of the past. Taken from the iSyllabus introductory one year Islamic studies course running in cities around Scotland and England.
Updates
Welcome to the new Solas Foundation website
22/Jul/2018

Home / Articles /
Sunday, 22nd July 2018
Reflections on Broken Britain
by Shaykh Ruzwan Mohammed
19th Apr 2009
Social commentators have, over the past year or so, been engaged in a protracted furore over the merits of the ‘Broken Britain’ debate. Statistics come thick and fast, painting a picture of a society that has atrophied and failed. Social, crime or health indicators vie to paint an increasingly bleak canvas of societal discord.

That society has at its core broken individuals is a more telling indicator of our predicament. Wantonness and the lack of a collective moral compass, when coupled with social and economic inequity, are bound to take their toll on any society.

Though few can now argue that theism is a condition for the leading of a moral life at an individual level, it is equally apparent from the annals of twentieth century history that a purely secular approach to morality has failed in providing standards that are collectively passed from generation to generation in a shared societal narrative. This is the prima-facie charge facing post-modern Britain today. The enduring legacy of Faiths has always been the ability to pass on, through shared traditions, collective social mores effectively to both the thinker and the layman alike.

Alas the luxury of choosing between a secular or a faith-based solution to our contemporary moral ills is one afforded to us by neither fate nor circumstance. What is required is a more resilient concerted solution from the whole of Civil Society.

The 12th century Muslim philosopher Averroes ventured to summarize moral ethics as being enshrined in the preservation five main values; those of life, wealth, freedom of faith, intellect and progeny. What is interesting is that he proposed this in Spain at a time of competing faiths and denominations all scrambling for a shared vantage point from which to deal with the moral and social issues of the day.

It would be true to say that a similar venture is required today. It is a task that is as daunting as it is pressing, but as Goethe said ’ mountains cannot be surmounted except by winding paths.





Megrahi and the Islamic view
by Shaykh Ruzwan Mohammed
Reclaiming Islam
by Dr. Azeem Ibrahim
Reflections on Broken Britain
by Shaykh Ruzwan Mohammed
Join the Solas Foundation mailing list and we'll update you
regularly on our activities.
Your email will remain private, and it's one click to unsubscribe.
© 2018 The Solas Foundation  |  Privacy & Terms  |  Contact